Posted on Leave a comment

June Awareness Dates for APS, Tourettes, Cataracts, Migraine and Headaches, and PTSD

Get out your calendars! June is Awareness Month for APS, Tourettes, Cataracts, Migraine and Headaches, and June 27th is PTSD day! This month, I’ll be covering these topics and more.

APS, or Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: occurs when your immune system mistakenly creates antibodies that make your blood much more likely to clot.

Red Blood Cells and Proteins

 

 

 

 

 

Tourettes: A nervous system disorder involving repetitive movements or unwanted sounds.

 

 

 

 

Cataracts: Cataracts are cloudy areas in the lens of the eye that can cause changes in vision. Symptoms of cataracts include cloudy or fuzzy vision and sensitivity to glare. Cataracts are treated with surgery.

Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/newarta-4978945/?utm_source=link-attribution&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=image&utm_content=5028090">Paul Diaconu</a> from <a href="https://pixabay.com/?utm_source=link-attribution&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=image&utm_content=5028090">Pixabay</a>

 

 

 

Migraine: A severe throbbing pain, generally experienced on one side of the head.

Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/geralt-9301/?utm_source=link-attribution&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=image&utm_content=622050">Gerd Altmann</a> from <a href="https://pixabay.com/?utm_source=link-attribution&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=image&utm_content=622050">Pixabay</a>

 

 

 

Headaches: There are over 150 types of headaches, but the most common types include: tension headaches, migraine, cluster, chronic daily headaches, sinus, exercise, and so many more.

 

 

 

PTSD: Post-traumatic stress disorder: A mental health condition that develops following a traumatic event.

These are the topics we’ll cover this month. If you have any questions or comments or would like to add your experiences please send me a comment through the contact me page.

 

 

 

Posted on Leave a comment

Part 3 of May Awareness

Welcome to Part 3 of May Awareness! Hi Guys and Gals!

**This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links.

May is Better Sleep Month by the Better Sleep Council. Did you know 90 million Americans have their sleep disrupted by snoring? The Better Sleep Council has so much information on getting better sleep. They even have a quiz to help you determine what type of mattress would suit you best. Check it out here!


 

May is Correct Posture Month by the American Chiropractic Association.

According to the ACA, “Good posture helps us stand, walk, sit, and lie in positions that place the least strain on supporting muscles and ligaments during movement and weight-bearing activities. Poor posture can lead to excessive strain on our postural muscles and may even cause them to relax when held in certain positions for long periods of time. For example, you can typically see this in people who bend forward at the waist for a prolonged time in the workplace. Their postural muscles are more prone to injury and back pain.


 

May is Huntington’s Disease Awareness Month.

A condition that leads to progressive degeneration of nerve cells in the brain.
How common is condition?
Rare (Fewer than 200,000 cases per year in the US)
Is condition treatable?
Treatments can help manage the condition, no known cure
Does diagnosis require lab test or imaging?
Often requires lab test or imaging
Time taken for recovery
Can last several years or be lifelong
Condition Highlight
Family history may increase the likelihood
Condition Highlight
Urgent medical attention recommended
Learn more about Huntington’s Disease through the Huntington’s Disease Society of America.


May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month. Learn more at the Lupus Disease Foundation.

A tick-borne disease caused by bacteria Borrelia Burgdorfer.
How common is condition?
Very common (More than 3 million cases per year in the US)
Is condition treatable?
Treatment from medical professional advised
Does diagnosis require lab test or imaging?
Requires lab test or imaging
Time taken for recovery
Can last several days or weeks
How is condition transmitted?
Transmitted through tick bites

Many people with early-stage Lyme disease develop a distinctive circular rash at the site of the tick bite, usually around three to 30 days after being bitten. This is known as erythema migrans. The rash is often described as looking like a bulls-eye on a dartboard.

Some of the common symptoms are as follows:

  • Rashes
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Fatigue
  • Headache

Symptoms of late-stage Lyme disease:

  • Numbness in hands and legs
  • Arthritis
  • Short term memory loss

Finally, but not exclusively, May is the awareness month for Neurofibromatosis. The Children’s Tumor Foundation website has so much valuable information on this incurable genetic disorder (s). They have a superb resource library. NF can cause tumors to grow on nerves throughout the body. You can donate, volunteer, and advocate by visiting their website for more information.


Posted on Leave a comment

May – A Huge Awareness month

May is a huge awareness month. I’ve written about arthritis, an important topic for me, but there are also many other important illnesses we should also be talking about.

  • https://www.facebook.com/kathrynbj
  • Twitter Share
  • https://www.linkedin.com/in/kathryn-j-97b74644/
ALS

is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease that is 100% fatal. You can help change the facts.

(From alsa.org) ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. A-myo-trophic comes from the Greek language. “A” means no. “Myo” refers to muscle, and “Trophic” means nourishment – “No muscle nourishment.” When a muscle has no nourishment, it “atrophies” or wastes away. “Lateral” identifies the areas in a person’s spinal cord where portions of the nerve cells that signal and control the muscles are located. As this area degenerates, it leads to scarring or hardening (“sclerosis”) in the region.

To read all about ALS, please see http://www.alsa.org/about-als/what-is-als.html

You may donate to the ALS Association,1275 K Street, NW Suite 250; Washington, DC 20005 – see ALSA.org

Borderline Personality Disorder

In May of 2007, the National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder (NEABPD) organized hearings before congress to educate legislators about Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). A year later, in April 2008 the U.S. House of Representatives declared May as Borderline Personality Disorder Awareness Month. *1 –https://evolvetreatment.com/blog/may-is-borderline-personality-disorder-awareness-month/

Five Quick BPD Facts

  1. Over 14 million Americans suffer from BPD.
  2. More people have BPD than schizophrenia and bipolar disorder combined.
  3. People with BPD commit suicide at 400 times the rate of the general population
  4. BPD is more common in women than in men.
  5. BPD is the 3rd leading cause of death for young adult women between 15-24.

5.9% of the adult population has BPD, they commit suicide at an alarming rate, and women are especially vulnerable to the disorder. That’s why we have Borderline Personality Disorder Awareness Month. To raise awareness and awareness, end the stigma around the condition, and encourage people to get the help they need.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) BPD is:

“A mental illness marked by a pattern of varying moods, self-image, and behavior. These symptoms often result in impulsive actions and problems in relationships. People with BPD may experience intense episodes of anger, depression, and anxiety that can last from a few hours to days.”

Mental Health –

a great website for this is https://www.mhanational.org/mental-health-month. This website is chock full of great information! As a member of a family who knows the importance of observing mental health month, I urge you to learn as much as you can. Another partner, NIMH, has offered up some additional informative websites

 

Posted on Leave a comment

Fibromyalgia Day

I’ve had fibromyalgia since my late 20’s. As I’m 59 now, that’s 30 plus years of dealing with the pain and nerve ending never-ending soreness and pain. Add a bit of arthritis, and disc degenerative disease and it makes for the perfect “How will I ever get through this day” type of day.

So how did Fibromyalgia day come about?

Reading from the National Fibromyalgia Associaton website:

It all started here at the NFA back in 1998, when our founders, Lynne Matallana and Karen Lee Richards, set out to get as many cities, counties, and states as possible to proclaim May 12th as Fibromyalgia Awareness Day.

They mailed out over 100 proclamation packets to individuals and support groups across the U.S. with suggestions on how to approach political leaders about the importance of creating awareness for this virtually unknown illness. That first year, Lynne was able to get the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to officially proclaim May 12th as Fibromyalgia Awareness Day (L.A. County includes 88 cities). Approximately 25 other jurisdictions across the country did the same.

The next year, about 150 proclamations were done. In the first 5 years of Awareness Days, there were over 2,000 proclamations in cities, counties, states, the U.S. Senate, Congress, and even at the White House, thus officially making May 12th National Fibromyalgia Awareness Day. The trend continues to this day and many thousands of Awareness Day proclamations have been made all over the world. That means that each of the entities that have proclaimed an official Fibromyalgia Awareness Day recognizes that FM is a legitimate life-altering illness, and they support the under-served population of people living with it by calling for more research and new treatments to help improve their quality of life.

May 12th is a day to remember how far we have come, from the days when almost no one had even heard the word “fibromyalgia,” to today when almost everyone has heard of it and knows someone who lives it. It is also a day to celebrate yourself for the fibro warrior you are, or the fibro warriors you support. You are part of this thriving community that was one of the first truly disruptive organizations to make a difference in how the world treats people in pain.

To celebrate the 20th National Fibromyalgia Awareness Day, create your own event or fundraiser in support of the NFA. Click here for the NFA’s guidelines and tips to help you get started. May 12th is just around the corner—let’s spend it together!

For more on the history of Fibromyalgia Awareness Day, check out this page on the NFA website.

What is Fibromyalgia / Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory, and mood issues. Researchers believe that fibromyalgia amplifies painful sensations by affecting the way your brain processes pain signals.

I hope this explanation helps you with a bit of knowledge about Fibromyalgia.